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Hoglumps Q + A

Hoglumps is run by the talented Alex Brownell.
Lovely screen printed goods and textiles, handmade in Canada.
Check out our Hoglumps Artist Q + A!

How did you start?
I’ve been sewing since I was a child, I think I learned to sew in Brownies (the thing before Girl Scouts). I would make little plushies from socks, and alter clothing to my taste. My interest in sewing led me to the Craft & Design program for textiles at Sheridan College. There I learned more about dyeing and screen printing fabric. From there I started to make my own little projects on the side and sell at a few craft shows. And so Hoglumps slowly began.

What is your process? What art tool could you not live without?
My process starts with a rough sketch and notes of my idea. Then I create a more detailed drawing with colour choices. Next I usually source fabric and hardware and make a few prototypes. I then screen print my fabric and cut out the pattern pieces. Then, SEW! Lots of sewing. And ironing. 
One tool I could not live without is a nice sharp pair of fabric scissors. Oh and clear gridded rulers! They both make the process so much easier.  

Where do you get your inspiration?
I get my inspiration from a lot of things. Stuff that makes me laugh or smile, like comic books or my cat, flowers and bugs I see on a walk. I also get a lot of inspiration to continue making by watching my friends and mentors make a living from their work. Watching them succeed is awesome. 

Is there anything you are currently working on that you are excited about?
Recently I have been playing with the idea of making some clothes with my screen printed patterns. I also just opened an online shop on Etsy. 

For more info on Hoglumps:
Instagram: @hoglumps 
Website: hoglumps.com

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Sparkle Collective Q + A

We had the pleasure of interviewing Sparkle Collective
Britt Saunders is the creator of Sparkle Collective. Based out of Toronto, Canada
Sparkle Collective is fuelled by donuts, and inspired by cats and magic.

Sparkle Collective Artist Q & A:

How did you start?
My background is in graphic design, but I’ve been drawing since I was a kid! I was always kind of shy and apprehensive about sharing my artwork with others, but back in early 2015, I stepped out of my comfort zone and created an Instagram account to post some of my illustrations online. I really wasn’t sure what to expect, but I ended up receiving so much encouragement that I decided to start selling stickers and handmade brooches just a couple of months later. Since then, I’ve expanded my product line to include enamel pins, patches, and apparel.

What is your process? What art tool could you not live without?
I usually sketch out all of my ideas on paper or my iPad, and then I refine and finish them in Adobe Illustrator. The art tool I probably couldn’t live without is my Apple Pencil!
I use it almost daily.


Where do you get your inspiration?
So many things! I’m continuously inspired by everything I loved when I was a kid, including rainbow colour palettes, outer space, and all things magical. My cat (and all of his cuteness/sassiness) also inspires me on a daily basis!

Is there anything you are currently working on that you are excited about?
I’m currently working on my upcoming fall collection, which I’m hoping to have available by early October. I’ll have lots of new pins as well as a few other fun surprises!

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Allison + Cam Q&A

We had the pleasure of sitting down with Allison Burda + Cam Gee,
Working collaboratively they make illustrations and animations as well as sell there own line of greeting cards. They create things in the spirit of colour and fun.

Allison + Cam Artist Q & A:

How did you start?
Neither of us went to art school but when we first started dating we realized we had an excellent creative dynamic. We made small comics, animations, and filled sketchbooks with little throwaway projects we made together. We got a lot of positive feedback from the people who saw our work so we started to post illustrations on a weekly blog and printed out some of our work to sell online. From there we were contacted by a few publishers and magazine art directors and started getting paid for our work. But it took years of taking on freelance projects and juggling 1 or 2 days jobs until we were able to make this our full-time gig.

What is your process? What art tool could you not live without?

One of us will mention an idea. If it’s digital work (like planning our cards and stickers), usually Cam will map it out; he’s amazing with rough sketching composition. Then one of us will flesh it out in Photoshop. I’m almost always in charge of colour. If we’re working with irl materials like clay, plaster, paint, wood then it’s kind of a free for all where we converge and diverge throughout the process until the project feels complete. Our work is always stronger when it’s a collaboration than
when we work separately

Where do you get your inspiration?

No one place. We love and collect children’s picture books, and we have a toddler who does bizarre baby stuff and his motions are often a jumping off point for animations. Usually ideas start in a sketchbook that seems to get the most action in the late evenings. Mostly we randomly put ideas on paper and then forget them for months at a time, then we revisit them and the idea feels stronger than it did in the beginning. If it makes us laugh when we come back
to it then it’s worth turning into something.

Is there anything you are currently working on that you are excited about?

We’ve been caught between some large and looming editorial contracts for the last 2 years which have all finished up for the moment so this is the first time in a while where we’ve been able to work on stuff that’s just for us. We’ve been working on plaster sculpture this summer and we’re in the middle of making everything we need to try out punch rug hooking. September is coming and our free time is almost up so we’re savouring this creative trial and error before the autumn
editorial rush picks up again.